New Prisons, Old Ideas

Next week sees the scheduled opening of HMP Oakwood, near Wolverhampton, to be run by multi-national security services firm G4S. With 1,605 beds, it will be one of the largest prisons in the nation. This follows closely on the heels of HMP Thameside, operated by Serco, which opened last month in South East London. By this time next year, with both facilities projected to be operating at full capacity, the total number of available places in the prison estate will stand at 91,000.

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Incapacitation over rehabilitation?

This month’s Ministry of Justice consultation document Punishment and Reform: Effective Community Sentences is the latest in a series of efforts to increase public and judicial support for non-custodial sentences by making them ‘tougher’. Unfortunately, it’s beset by all of the long-established problems with such an approach, plus a few new ones of its own.

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The eurozone’s vicious circle

The eurocrisis is back, as expected. Greece is contained – at least for the moment – and attention has shifted to Spain. Twenty per cent unemployment, a shrinking economy, rising government deficits, and public and private debts totalling more than four times its national income have conspired to panic the financial markets. Spain has failed to hit the stringent borrowing targets set by the EU. Costs of borrowing for the Spanish government have shot up in the few days since Easter.

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Mapping the global transition to a new economics

It was never quite clear where or when the novelist William Gibson made his famous remark about the future – it is “already here – it’s just not very evenly distributed”.

Some sources say 1993, some say 1999. Either way, when it comes to the new economics, it is emphatically true. The planet may be struggling. The economy may be unbalanced. But it is possible to glimpse the Great Transition to a new economics partly by looking around us.

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The strange case of the Nobel economist who doesn’t understand how banks work (wonkish)

Paul Krugman is one of the most influential economists in the world.  He won the Nobel Memorial Prize in economics in 2008 for his work on international trade patterns and has advised the World Bank, the IMF and the UN. More

The strange case of the Nobel economist who doesn’t understand how banks work (wonkish)

Paul Krugman is one of the most influential economists in the world.  He won the Nobel Memorial Prize in economics in 2008 for his work on international trade patterns and has advised the World Bank, the IMF and the UN. More

Photographing the New Austerity and the Big Society

As we have blogged on previously, a key part of how we are doing our research into the New Austerity and the Big Society is by working with peer researchers in Tottenham and Birmingham. More

The human tragedy of Greek austerity

This morning at 9am, a 77 year old pensioner shot himself dead on Syntagma (Constitution) square in Athens, Greece.

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A call for systemic prevention

On the 9th May, nef is organising an event at the LSE on ‘The Wisdom of Prevention’. This could not come at a more crucial time, when the Coalition government is destroying the last fragments of a social democratic commitment to social justice.

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Counted on, but not counted: women’s roles in the New Austerity and the Big Society

"We know there's a differential impact on women - we know that women take on more responsibilities, will step into the breach when their elderly relatives receive inadequate support, when their children receive inadequate support. More

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