Mapping the global transition to a new economics

It was never quite clear where or when the novelist William Gibson made his famous remark about the future – it is “already here – it’s just not very evenly distributed”.

Some sources say 1993, some say 1999. Either way, when it comes to the new economics, it is emphatically true. The planet may be struggling. The economy may be unbalanced. But it is possible to glimpse the Great Transition to a new economics partly by looking around us.

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The strange case of the Nobel economist who doesn’t understand how banks work (wonkish)

Paul Krugman is one of the most influential economists in the world.  He won the Nobel Memorial Prize in economics in 2008 for his work on international trade patterns and has advised the World Bank, the IMF and the UN. More

The strange case of the Nobel economist who doesn’t understand how banks work (wonkish)

Paul Krugman is one of the most influential economists in the world.  He won the Nobel Memorial Prize in economics in 2008 for his work on international trade patterns and has advised the World Bank, the IMF and the UN. More

Photographing the New Austerity and the Big Society

As we have blogged on previously, a key part of how we are doing our research into the New Austerity and the Big Society is by working with peer researchers in Tottenham and Birmingham. More

The human tragedy of Greek austerity

This morning at 9am, a 77 year old pensioner shot himself dead on Syntagma (Constitution) square in Athens, Greece.

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A call for systemic prevention

On the 9th May, nef is organising an event at the LSE on ‘The Wisdom of Prevention’. This could not come at a more crucial time, when the Coalition government is destroying the last fragments of a social democratic commitment to social justice.

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Counted on, but not counted: women’s roles in the New Austerity and the Big Society

"We know there's a differential impact on women - we know that women take on more responsibilities, will step into the breach when their elderly relatives receive inadequate support, when their children receive inadequate support. More

Announcing the Festival of Transition

“If I can’t dance, I don’t want to be in your revolution,” is one of those famous sayings which were never actually, precisely spoken by the person to whom they were attributed. Just as the observation that Britain is a nation of shopkeepers never came out of Napoleon’s mouth yet remains indelibly associated with him (it was his secretary who said it), the desire for revolutionary change to be joyous stuck to the American fin de siècle radical activist Emma Goldman because it spoke a deep truth about her outlook.

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Well-being: the story so far

What leads to well-being? It’s one of the oldest philosophical questions, mused over by Aristotle, Plato, Seneca and others, so it’s perhaps unsurprising that academics have also, for a long time, tried to find some answers through scientific investigation. More

Can the Big Society cut it in an age of austerity?

At a time when massive public spending cuts are heralding the effective retreat of the state, people, communities and the third sector are expected to step in and fill the gaps that are inevitably opening up and widening. This, in essence, is the Big Society; a call to arms for active citizens and locally based organisations to build better communities; the social policy that makes the Government’s economic policies politically palatable.

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